Care-Model Innovation

November 29, 2018
As a society, we’re starting to pay more attention to low back pain. The mounting public health crisis around opioid addiction, the huge costs of procedures to diagnose pain, and the aggressive treatment options like spinal surgery have spurred the search for alternative ways to treat this condition, which affects at least 40 percent of adults at some point in their lives. But what about their younger counterparts? Research shows low back pain is developing with increasing frequen­cy in adolescents, and many carry it on into adulthood.
June 12, 2018
Low back pain affects almost a third of Americans. While there is a long-standing belief that low back pain is limited to adults, research has shown it develops with increasing frequency during adolescence. With the increasing concern about opioid prescription rates, including among U.S. youth—up to 40 percent with low back pain receive opioids as part of their treatment—there is heightened urgency to identify safe and effective non-drug treatment options. Spinal manipulation and exercise are two such approaches which are recommended for adults with low back pain. Little is known, however, regarding the effectiveness of these treatments for adolescent low back pain sufferers.
March 27, 2018
The gonging of a Tibetan singing bowl signifies the start and end of staff meetings at The Waters in Oakdale. Before every shift, the health and wellbeing team comes together for huddles to talk about their intentions for the day and what they will focus on, starting perhaps with a guided imagery exercise or aromatherapy. Grounded and primed with information needed to provide excellent care, these nurse leaders head out to engage with residents.
March 13, 2018
Just 3 years ago, I had never practiced mindfulness, and the word “mindfulness” had likely never even passed my lips. Now, being mindful is an intention I have for all of the moments of my day. Mindfulness practices find their way into all parts of my life, all locations of my life, and they support me in being the person that I mean to be. - Jamie Edwards, School Social Worker in a local public school
January 25, 2018
In our world today, we are inundated by information. We pay professionals for advice, direction, and interventions. Physicians, nurses, nutritionists, and health professionals of all kinds give us treatments, directions and sometimes threats. The same is true of our financial advisers, accountants, personal trainers, marriage and family therapists, lawyers, etc. Despite all of this expert advice, we find it difficult to make the changes in our lives that we say we want to make. If we do make changes, we struggle to sustain them. Information alone does not lead to shifts in perspectives or actions. That is where coaching comes in.
June 6, 2016
When it comes to essential oils, there’s no shortage of health claims – from weight loss to immune system fortification and renewed mental clarity. But one thing’s certain: you’re probably using them wrong. Health Talk explored myths surrounding aromatherapy, essential oils safety and identified some do’s and don’ts for integrating them into your care.
May 10, 2015
When a child is sick in the hospital, finding ways to help families participate in the healing process can be transforming. However, introducing integrative therapies to children and families in ways that are accessible and fun can be challenging given different learning styles, varying ages, degrees of illness, and time constraints.
February 20, 2015
More Americans are practicing mind-body therapies, a recent survey from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) revealed. The survey compared data on integrative therapy use in the U.S., compiled from surveys taken in 2002, 2007 and 2012. By 2012, the number of adults practicing yoga, tai chi or qigong doubled, reaching 10 percent of the American adult population. Use of massage therapy and meditation grew, too.
June 3, 2013
With more than 5,000 music therapists in the U.S. today, music therapy is a practice that is growing in demand, popularity and relevance in today’s health care. Today’s music therapists work in a variety of health care facilities including psychiatric hospitals, rehabilitative facilities, medical hospitals, outpatient clinics, day care treatment centers, agencies serving persons with developmental disabilities, community mental health centers, drug and alcohol programs, senior centers, nursing homes, hospice programs, correctional facilities, halfway houses, schools, and private practice.