Mindfulness

March 22, 2016
More than 40 percent of Americans who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) do not disclose it to their primary care providers. A recent study through the School of Public Health and Center for Spirituality & Healing looked at patients who used CAM across the U.S., and analyzed reasoning for disclosing or not disclosing that information to providers. The study was published in JAMA Internal Medicine.
December 2, 2015
On calm mornings and evenings, the sandstone cliffs, rising hundreds of feet from the lake, are perfectly reflected below. While working with art models, the images, for me, always start with the landscape and my feelings about the land. I strive to utilize the figure as a way to connect the viewer in a deeper way to the sense of place. What does it feel like to be immersed by this environment?
December 1, 2015
At the Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing, we often talk as a team about the importance of living the work, and not just doing the work.
October 14, 2015
When I first became aware of mindfulness-based meditation, my initial reaction was, “this is nothing new — this is what I do every time I make a photograph! I’ve been striving to get better at this my whole life.”
October 2, 2015
For more than a decade, the University of Minnesota’s Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing has offered mindfulness programs to the campus and Twin Cities communities. From an 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program, to other opportunities like Mindfulness at Work, Mindfulness in Motion, and Mindful Eating, the Center has provided learning opportunities to thousands of people. At the heart of this program are our mindfulness teachers, who are all certified – or currently in training – at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, the nation’s most established and rigorous training institute. Learn more about our instructors in the following stories.
September 29, 2015
As summer ends and to-do lists grow longer, stress seems unavoidable. But it’s important to give our minds and bodies a break; our wellbeing and productivity depend on it. “Research has shown that we literally can’t do it all,” says Mary Jo Kreitzer, Ph.D., R.N., founder and director of the Center for Spirituality & Healing at the University of Minnesota. “When we’re trying to do too many things at once, we’re dividing our brain up and putting less effort and level of detail into each individual activity.”
September 21, 2015
In his 40-plus year career, Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, has become a pioneer for mindfulness-based practices nationwide and abroad. Since founding the renowned Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts in 1979, Kabat-Zinn has traveled throughout the world, giving lectures and generously sharing his expertise as others cultivate the practice of mindfulness in health care settings, schools and communities. He has written a dozen books on the topic—and countless articles. So when he shared a particularly candid reflection with Mary Jo Kreitzer, PhD, and her team shortly after she founded the University of Minnesota’s Center for Spirituality & Healing, she was not quick to forget it.
September 14, 2015
Center mindfulness teachers participate in study that examines mindfulness as a healing skill for veterans.
May 17, 2014
For us Northerners, who have just lived through the cold and long nights of winter, the thought of spring brings on a torrent of adrenalin as full and fast as the snowmelt-flooded streams. With the longer days and warming temperatures comes new growth—a procession of wildflowers, each emerging at the optimal time to out-compete the neighbors for sunlight and fertilizing insects.

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