Research

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May 13, 2019
Researchers at the Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing have had six abstracts accepted for presentation at the 2019 International Forum for Back and Neck Pain Research in Primary Care; the team will head to the forum in Quebec in July.
February 25, 2019
Roni L. Evans, Ph.D., D.C., M.S., research director of the Integrative Health and Wellbeing Research Program and an associate professor at the University of Minnesota’s Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing, has been appointed to the National Advisory Council for Complementary and Integrative Health. The NACCIH serves as the principal advisory body to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, the lead federal agency for research on complementary and integrative health.
November 29, 2018
As a society, we’re starting to pay more attention to low back pain. The mounting public health crisis around opioid addiction, the huge costs of procedures to diagnose pain, and the aggressive treatment options like spinal surgery have spurred the search for alternative ways to treat this condition, which affects at least 40 percent of adults at some point in their lives. But what about their younger counterparts? Research shows low back pain is developing with increasing frequen­cy in adolescents, and many carry it on into adulthood.
July 31, 2018
"Patients and families are voicing a desire for (an integrative) approach to care, and there is increasing evidence that integrative approaches can improve clinical outcomes including symptom management. If embedded into the ongoing delivery of care, the implementation of integrative nursing is both feasible and sustainable. It requires investment in education and leadership, and perhaps most importantly, a culture change that embraces a whole-person, whole-system approach to patient care." - Center faculty Megan Voss, DNP, and Mary Jo Kreitzer, PhD, in a new paper published in MDPI.
June 12, 2018
Low back pain affects almost a third of Americans. While there is a long-standing belief that low back pain is limited to adults, research has shown it develops with increasing frequency during adolescence. With the increasing concern about opioid prescription rates, including among U.S. youth—up to 40 percent with low back pain receive opioids as part of their treatment—there is heightened urgency to identify safe and effective non-drug treatment options. Spinal manipulation and exercise are two such approaches which are recommended for adults with low back pain. Little is known, however, regarding the effectiveness of these treatments for adolescent low back pain sufferers.
March 6, 2018
The University of Minnesota’s Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing and the YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities are teaming up on a study to help these adults enhance their health and wellbeing so they can live their best lives. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the study focuses on developing and testing a new educational program called Mindful Movement which aims to help adults ages 50 and up overcome barriers to exercise, and gain the skills and motivation to improve their wellbeing.
Tags: Wellbeing
September 20, 2017
The University of Minnesota’s Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing has been awarded the first phase of a cooperative $11.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study non-drug approaches to prevent chronic low back pain, which could lead to reduced opioid use.
December 15, 2016
Current treatment options for chronic pain focus on managing pain & symptoms. That often includes prescription painkillers. But with the growing opioid epidemic, more people are considering alternative options. A recent clinical trial from researchers at the Center for Spirituality & Healing explored that trend, looking specifically at chronic neck pain in older adults. The study analyzed costs and outcomes for three different treatment recommendations for chronic neck pain. The results were published in The Spine Journal.
November 4, 2016
This cutting-edge technology holds the promise to assist numerous patients suffering from neuromuscular disorders and other brain diseases.
March 22, 2016
More than 40 percent of Americans who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) do not disclose it to their primary care providers. A recent study through the School of Public Health and Center for Spirituality & Healing looked at patients who used CAM across the U.S., and analyzed reasoning for disclosing or not disclosing that information to providers. The study was published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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