Thought Leadership

February 21, 2018
As I reflect on our current culture and what behavior is considered status quo, I intuitively sense that as an American culture we are overstimulated, undernourished, and disconnected from our deeper lives. I recently heard that in the leading technology country of South Korea, one of the newest forms of rehabilitation centers popping up all over is technology addiction centers. And it leaves me as a health coach reflecting on the many types of nourishment that we tend to overlook as we stay responsive to the constant external stimulation and distraction of our current society. This article is my health coach remedy for the epidemic we face.
January 25, 2018
In our world today, we are inundated by information. We pay professionals for advice, direction, and interventions. Physicians, nurses, nutritionists, and health professionals of all kinds give us treatments, directions and sometimes threats. The same is true of our financial advisers, accountants, personal trainers, marriage and family therapists, lawyers, etc. Despite all of this expert advice, we find it difficult to make the changes in our lives that we say we want to make. If we do make changes, we struggle to sustain them. Information alone does not lead to shifts in perspectives or actions. That is where coaching comes in.
June 12, 2017
"For all of his many contributions to human health throughout the past 70 years, I cannot think of a more worthy person for the Center to be named in honor of than Earl Bakken. He is a man of paradox: an engineer who envisions a world of high-touch integrated healing, a leader who inspires others, but lets them go their own way, an introvert who will happily stand on a convention floor for 12 hours at a time, talking to other dreamers and prospective adopters of his ideas." - Bill George, former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Medtronic
January 12, 2017
Food plays a significant role in health & wellbeing. New UMN course teaches medical students how to cook for their bodies, with hopes that they can convey this knowledge to future patients.
December 15, 2016
Current treatment options for chronic pain focus on managing pain & symptoms. That often includes prescription painkillers. But with the growing opioid epidemic, more people are considering alternative options. A recent clinical trial from researchers at the Center for Spirituality & Healing explored that trend, looking specifically at chronic neck pain in older adults. The study analyzed costs and outcomes for three different treatment recommendations for chronic neck pain. The results were published in The Spine Journal.
August 29, 2016
There has been a lot of attention recently on bullying in schools and the detrimental impact on students' mental health and wellbeing. In 2015, the Minnesota Senate passed a bill that requires school districts to develop and enforce a plan to reduce bullying. Not surprisingly, bullying doesn't end on the playground.
June 6, 2016
When it comes to essential oils, there’s no shortage of health claims – from weight loss to immune system fortification and renewed mental clarity. But one thing’s certain: you’re probably using them wrong. Health Talk explored myths surrounding aromatherapy, essential oils safety and identified some do’s and don’ts for integrating them into your care.
March 22, 2016
More than 40 percent of Americans who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) do not disclose it to their primary care providers. A recent study through the School of Public Health and Center for Spirituality & Healing looked at patients who used CAM across the U.S., and analyzed reasoning for disclosing or not disclosing that information to providers. The study was published in JAMA Internal Medicine.
January 26, 2016
Dying is an uncomfortable topic of conversation. No one wants to bring it up, not even our doctors. Unfortunately, this leads to miscommunication about how a person wants to die. In fact, about 7 in 10 Americans would prefer to die at home, but only about a quarter of them actually do. “There is a fundamental disconnect between what happens and what we want, and that stems from a lack of communication about dying,” says Frank Bennett, MDiv., senior fellow in the University of Minnesota Center for Spirituality & Healing and former hospital chaplain and minister. “Most care providers frame the conversation around therapeutic interventions, because that’s their focus, but patients think in terms of goals, hopes and fears.”

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