COVID-19: Bakken Center Information and Resources

Health Professionals

Health Professionals

If you are a healthcare provider that is working on the frontline, thank you for all that you are doing. Your commitment to patient care is nothing short of heroic. While you are taking care of others, it is important that you also take care of your own health and wellbeing. We have compiled some resources below that may be of help. If we are missing something that you would like to see, or you would like to tell us which resources you found most helpful - give us feedback.

If you are a healthcare leader, you want to do everything you can to support your team’s wellbeing in these unprecedented times. The good news is there is much you can do.

The University of Minnesota’s Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing has developed these wellbeing resources for your use - they are designed to be practical, customizable, and easily deployed through every communication channel and in your own personal communication style. Here, you will find content for use in huddles, in written communications, in meetings - however you are communicating with your team.

Teams want to know their leaders genuinely care about their wellbeing - this can’t be overstated. You can demonstrate your authentic caring and commitment in ways large and small, day in and day out. We hope these wellbeing resources will help you feel supported as a leader as you work to support your team during this difficult time.


We also invite you to explore the resources for the general public in the "Community" tab of this page.

Leaders and Organizations

Leaders and Organizations

As a leader, you want to do everything you can to support your team’s wellbeing in these unprecedented times. The good news is there is much you can do.

The University of Minnesota’s Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing has developed these wellbeing resources for your use - they are designed to be practical, customizable, and easily deployed through every communication channel in your own personal communication style. Here you will find content for use in huddles, in written communications, in meetings - however you are communicating with your team.

Teams want to know their leaders genuinely care about their wellbeing - this can’t be overstated. You can demonstrate your authentic caring and commitment in ways large and small, day in and day out. We hope these wellbeing resources will help you feel supported as a leader as you work to support your team during this difficult time. 

These resources are now available in the "Health Professionals" and "Community" tabs of this page. Please share these resources with your team and anyone else who would benefit.

Students

Students

The Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing understands that the COVID-19 pandemic can add many stressors to your college experience. We invite you to explore the "Community" tab of this website where you'll find many resources that may be of help during this time of great change and uncertainty. Information about University of Minnesota student life, student affairs, technology, and more may be found below. If you have questions regarding your experience as a student at the Center, please contact your professor or csh-academics@umn.edu. We also encourage you to visit our Taking Charge of Your Health & Wellbeing website, where you'll find tips about stress prevention and reduction, purpose, relationships, environment, videos and articles with wellbeing experts, and more. 

Community

Community

The Center's Taking Charge of Your Health & Wellbeing website offers an extensive set of articles, videos, and online activities (including online wellbeing assessments and goal setting) about ways to enhance your wellbeing. Below are a series of tips cultivated from this website for this time of great change and uncertainty.

Mariann Johnson has made some wonderful at-home yoga and meditation videos that you can view here:

If you are a health professional, we invite you to explore the resources in the "Health Professionals" tab of this page.

Our new Student and Community Wellbeing Guides feature tips and strategies to help you focus on their wellbeing.

Download our Wellbeing Guides

Stress Busters is an informal hour of meditation and light movement guided by our experienced instructors. Refresh and recharge with exercises that will leave you feeling physically, emotionally, intellectually, and spiritually rejuvenated. This class is free but registration is required.

Fall 2020 Guiding Principles

Fall 2020 Guiding Principles

There is no singular approach that creates perfect protection or a “bubble." We have a multi-layered approach that reduces risk to the greatest degree possible while providing flexibility and adaptability to meet the needs of individuals and our collective University community.


University courses will be offered in multiple modalities to provide alternatives to all students and faculty (and
everyone has a choice). Four primary modalities: in-person, blended (hybrid), online (asynchronous), and remote (synchronous).

Together—and only together—can we keep our campus communities healthy, safe, and well. Students, faculty, staff, and visitors on any of our five campuses (or other University grounds or facilities across the state) are asked to regularly demonstrate a strong personal responsibility in adhering to University, local, and state requirements, such as wearing face coverings in many settings, and taking basic actions, such as hand washing, which can dramatically slow viral spread.

The University will reduce restrictions as public health conditions allow (i.e., broadly available vaccines, more
effective therapeutics, improvement in public health data). Until that time, operations must remain focused on
capably advancing the University’s work while minimizing the spread of COVID-19.

University Public Health

University Public Health

The University is taking a two-pronged approach to controlling the spread of the virus, focusing on the physical infrastructure of our campuses and the personal decisions we all make.

University Facilities
Public hygiene measures are effective and proven to help limit and control the spread of COVID-19. The University has undertaken a variety of enhanced cleaning and sanitization procedures that will continue throughout the fall semester.

  • Increase regular cleaning and disinfecting of public spaces, with particular focus on high-touch surfaces in and around our facilities (i.e., door handles, elevator buttons).
  • Post COVID-19 messaging in public areas, including exterior doors, entrances, lobbies, and restrooms. These include “Stop the Spread” campaign materials, as well as CDC and MDH assets, where needed.
  • Provide hand-sanitizing stations at primary entrances to facilities and in high-traffic areas.
  • Remove or restrict access to some high-touch items.
  • Limit occupancy in classrooms and other indoor spaces. On average, University classrooms will now have a capacity of just 25 percent of what would have been typical in previous years.
  • Restrict access to buildings so only those who need to enter for class, work, or other University purposes will be in a particular facility.
  • Institute building traffic guidelines in hallways, restrooms, elevators, and escalators to ensure safe physical distancing. Supporting these guidelines, the University has updated class schedules to increase time between classes to reduce crowding in and around buildings.
  • Implement rigorous safety measures in housing and dining facilities in addition to limiting density in these settings. These measures include mandatory face coverings, physical distancing, and individual and community hygiene practices.
  • Require every department to prepare its own Sunrise Plan that incorporates all elements of protecting individuals within University facilities.
  • Develop plans through our Fraternity & Sorority Life and Off-Campus Living functions to support students living outside of University-operated facilities.

Personal Actions

Mandate that individuals on University-owned or controlled property must have facial coverings at all times when in indoor spaces or anywhere physical distancing is not possible. The University is providing two face masks per person to all students, faculty, and staff. Individual units may purchase more as they deem necessary. If individuals cannot wear a face covering for medical reasons, they should contact University Disability Resources for alternative solutions.

Establish that all members of the University community will ensure physical distancing in all situations where distancing is possible. The CDC, MDH, and public health experts worldwide continue to emphasize that distancing remains one of the most powerful tools we have to slow viral spread.

Set expectations that everyone within the University community will practice strong personal hygiene on a daily basis, notably hand washing, covering sneezes/coughs, and sanitizing common spaces before and after use. All members of the University community should clean and wipe common spaces before use. Wipes and cleaning supplies are available in multiple locations.

Appreciate individual decision-making with regard to students and faculty who elect not to physically return to campus this fall, whether to support their own health, the health of those close to them, or to further reduce density on campus.

MTest / COVID-19 Testing Plan

MTest / COVID-19 Testing Plan

Testing is an important part of a comprehensive, layered public health plan to reduce the spread of COVID-19 on our campuses. MTest, the University’s testing protocols and response plan, utilizes existing resources and aligns with guidelines established by MDH and the University’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) smart testing recommendations. MTest was developed by our Health Emergency Response Office with support from MDH and the University’s own public health, healthcare, and medical experts.

As part of this plan, testing is available at no cost for any member of the University exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms or those who have been exposed to a positive case (within six feet for more than 15 minutes). On-campus testing priority will be granted to students, as well as faculty/staff who have selected Boynton Health (on the Twin Cities campus) as their primary care clinic. In all instances, the University encourages community members to coordinate questions and care with their preferred health care provider.

Asymptomatic testing (excluding those referred to testing due to close contact) is not currently recommended by the CDC nor MDH and is not a component of the University’s testing plans. Such testing does not stop the spread of COVID-19 in our communities and provides only a snapshot of a moment in time. Not only can someone test negative one dayand then potentially be infected and begin passing on the virus the next, testing results can contribute to a false sense of security that diminishes the focus of proven prevention measures such as physical distancing, consistent use of face coverings, and personal hygiene. Further, regularly testing everyone who learns, works, lives, and visits our campuses is logistically impossible—particularly on the Twin Cities campus given the size of our campus population and our campus’ location within the Twin Cities Metro Area.

We have also planned extensively for necessary isolation and quarantine for members of our campus communities.

Staff and Faculty: If you are diagnosed with a confirmed case of COVID-19 and as instructed by a public health official, isolate at home for 10 days following the onset of symptoms (or diagnosis in asymptomatic cases) and for 3 days following the end of all symptoms. If you were determined to be exposed to a confirmed case of COVID-19, you should quarantine at home for 14 days or until otherwise directed by a healthcare or public health professional. Consult your healthcare provider for additional information.

Students in University housing: We will provide isolation housing for the duration of any isolation periodrecommended by healthcare and public health officials should you test positive for COVID-19. If you are notified of exposure to a confirmed COVID-19 case, you may be instructed to remain in quarantine in a space with a separate room and bathroom for at least 14 days. For those in isolation or quarantine, the University will provide the services you will need (i.e, accomodations, food, academic support). Upon completing the recommended isolation or quarantine, students will return to their University housing arrangement.

Students in housing not operated by the University: Students should have a plan in case they are instructed to isolate or quarantine in their residence. As best practice, plan for isolation to require you to remain in your residence, or return to a safe location (i.e., family home, close friend’s home) for 10 days following the onset of symptoms (or diagnosis in asymptomatic cases). If instructed to quarantine, you should have a plan to do so for at least 14 days. Consult with your healthcare provider for additional guidance.

In all cases, individuals who test positive or are instructed to quarantine must not return to campus and continue to follow healthcare instructions until their healthcare provider informs them otherwise.

Public Health Monitoring

Public Health Monitoring

The University has established a comprehensive plan to report on the health of our community as the Fall semester begins. These data will inform University leaders on the condition of our campus, the degree of virus spread, and the mitigation techniques that may be necessary to reduce the spread. In addition, the data will be used to determine if and when restrictions can be eased within our campus environment. Data are collected by our Health Emergency Response Office (HERO) and shared with senior leaders. Importantly, the information is aggregated from both University, local public health officials, and the Minnesota Department of Health to provide the University with the most comprehensive review possible of our status.